Bluebill Advisors, Inc. Consulting and resources | WCM CMS Web mobile publishing social digital marketing | Gilbane Conference2015-07-22T13:08:29Z https://bluebillinc.com/feed/atom/WordPress Frank Gilbane http://bluebillinc.com <![CDATA[iOS / Web developer opportunity with MassChallenge startup]]> http://bluebillinc.com/?p=2632 2015-06-01T15:28:39Z 2015-06-01T12:07:09Z A startup I am advising in Boston is in this year’s MassChallenge accelerator program and looking for a developer to work mainly on their iOS app. The company is AutismSees, and the description of the job is below. If interested please respond to: autismsees@gmail.com We are looking to hire a coder who is proficient in […]

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A startup I am advising in Boston is in this year’s MassChallenge accelerator program and looking for a developer to work mainly on their iOS app. The company is AutismSees, and the description of the job is below. If interested please respond to: autismsees@gmail.com

We are looking to hire a coder who is proficient in iOS as well as web development. (Java, HTML, CSS)

Podium

Is an app that allows practice of an interview or one on one conversation with real-time feedback and a score on the practice session based on voice recognition, eye / facial tracking software. Data and analytics are given to Autism Research on social and communication interactions. The app rewards users for practicing, and for increasing eye contact and successful body language during practice. Ability to export scored video interview to therapist, coach, mentor, or future employer.

Our mission is to enhance the social and occupational functioning of teens and young adults with technology that allows users to practice speaking, interviewing, and presenting to an audience.

We are entering Mass Challenge in Boston 2015 and also received the Ozy Genius Award for our development of the app this summer.

This person would ideally be someone who could integrate to our team and work alongside me as an Independent Service Provider (contracted basis) for equity in the company if we choose to hire them for the team at close of the summer.

The project is to develop an iOS app with integrated facial and eye tracking software (already in place from Visage in our product) based on designs our team is building. The app will allow users to stream questions from our Podium interface live on-screen of the application, with a start and stop time for each question. The user can select an audience on-screen to practice speaking to and receive feedback (in-app) based on the results of their speech timing, and the Visage Software.

The developer would need to work well with a team and with our Advisor for Technology Development at Tufts. He or She also needs to have a creative vision and passion for helping others – a desire to code something to help students around the world improve social and communication skills.

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cdurrell <![CDATA[Final reminder! Gilbane Speaker proposals due]]> http://bluebillinc.com/?p=2607 2015-05-05T14:29:14Z 2015-05-05T14:29:14Z Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel, Boston Workshops: December 1 • Main conference: December 2-3 The deadline for proposals has been extended to: May 8, 2015 Speaker proposal instructions and form The Gilbane Conference helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and technologies to produce superior customer experiences for all internal and external stakeholders. Conference […]

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Gilbane15 Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel, Boston
Workshops: December 1 • Main conference: December 2-3

The deadline for proposals has been extended to: May 8, 2015

Speaker proposal instructions and form

The Gilbane Conference helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and technologies to produce superior customer experiences for all internal and external stakeholders.

Conference Tracks

Content, Marketing, and Customer Experience
Designed for marketers, marketing technologists, social marketers, content marketers, growth hackers, web and mobile content managers, strategists and technologists focused on customer experience and digital marketing.

Content, Collaboration and Employee Experience
Designed for content, information, technical, and business managers focused on enterprise social, collaboration, knowledge sharing, and back-end content applications.

Re-imagining the Future: Ubiquitous Computing and Digital Transformation
Designed for technology strategists, IT, and marketing / business executives focused on near-term and future software, content, and computing devices to support customer or employee experiences.

Digital Strategies for Publishing and Media
Designed for publishing and information product managers, marketers, technologists, and business or channel managers focused on the transition to digital products and managing digital assets.

Deadline for proposals: May 8, 2015

Submit your proposal to speak at Gilbane today

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cdurrell <![CDATA[Four free activities at this week’s Gilbane Conference]]> http://bluebillinc.com/?p=2510 2014-12-01T15:53:19Z 2014-12-01T15:44:28Z Can’t make all three days of the Gilbane Conference? We’ve got plenty going on in the technology showcase too. Take advantage of our complimentary showcase pass and register onsite at the Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel, 606 Congress Street, Boston – across the street from the Silver Line Way stop. Your Showcase Pass includes access to: Opening Keynote Presentations – […]

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Can’t make all three days of the Gilbane Conference? We’ve got plenty going on in the technology showcase too. Take advantage of our complimentary showcase pass and register onsite at the Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel, 606 Congress Street, Boston – across the street from the Silver Line Way stop.

Your Showcase Pass includes access to:

  1. Opening Keynote Presentations – Tuesday 8:30 – 12:00
  2. All Product Labs – Tuesday & Wednesday
  3. Technology Showcase Area – Tuesday & Wednesday
  4. Sponsor Networking Reception – Tuesday 5:00 – 6:00

Showcase and conference registration is now open onsite Tuesday 8:00am – 6:00pm, and Wednesday 8:00am – 2:00pm.

Opening Keynotes – December 2: 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Moderator: Frank Gilbane, Founder, Gilbane Conferences, Bluebill Advisors

Brad Kagawa, VP Technology, Content Management Systems, The New York Times
How Multichannel Requirements Continue to Change Content Management, and What the New York Times is Doing to Keep Up
Dana Heger, Senior Program Manager & Product Owner, and Chris Anthony, Senior Program Manager of User Experience, Global Web Support, HP
How HP’s New Global Support Website Entered the 21st Century
Bill Gillis, CIO, Beth Israel Deaconess Care Organization
A Huge Opportunity: Overcoming the Challenges of Health Care Information Integration

Industry Analyst Panel – December 2: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Moderator: Frank Gilbane, Founder, Gilbane Conferences, Bluebill Advisors

Melissa Webster, Program VP, Content & Digital Media Technologies, IDC
Tony Byrne, Founder, Real Story Group
Scott Liewehr, Partner and Principal Analyst, Digital Clarity Group
Matt Mullen, Senior Analyst, Social Business, 451 Research

Product Labs

The Product Labs are open to conference attendees and visitors to the technology showcase free of charge, and are moderated and presented by conference sponsors. While the presentations are meant to be educational, they are typically focused on product technologies or customer case studies. They provide a good opportunity to learn more about specific products or vendors. See the schedule here.

Exhibitors

The Technology Showcase provides attendees with a central meeting place and the ability to speak one-on-one with industry-leading exhibitors while learning more about their products and services. See the exhibitors here.

Showcase Hours:

Tuesday, December 2          10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Networking Reception         5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, December 3    10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

* You can also still register onsite for the full conference starting at 8:00am Tuesday *

See you there!

The Gilbane Conference Team

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cdurrell <![CDATA[You have a special Bluebill discount …]]> http://bluebillinc.com/?p=2372 2014-11-22T13:16:44Z 2014-10-21T21:33:00Z to save $200 on the Conference and ConferencePlus and Conference Only options at this year’s Gilbane Conference. To get your Bluebill discount use priority code BB200 when registering online. I would like my $200 registration discount – code BB200 Join us in Boston December 2-4 and learn how your peers are building next generation digital experiences for their customers and […]

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to save $200 on the Conference and ConferencePlus and Conference Only options at this year’s Gilbane Conference. To get your Bluebill discount use priority code BB200 when registering online.

I would like my $200 registration discount – code BB200

Join us in Boston December 2-4 and learn how your peers are building next generation digital experiences for their customers and employees.

Hear from:

The New York Times • HP Global Web Support • Beth Israel Deaconess Care Organization • Harvard Business Review • WGBH • Marriott International • American Institute of Architects • New Balance • SAP • FamilySearch • EY • MassMutual Financial • Hartville Pet Insurance • Builder Homesite • Thomas Publishing, Activision, and many more.

Learn more about the conference program.

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Mary Laplante http://www.digitalclaritygroup.com <![CDATA[Avoiding the Dangers of the Unmanaged Customer Experience]]> http://bluebillinc.com/?p=2336 2014-10-21T11:16:17Z 2014-10-15T17:47:30Z Put your consumer hat on for a moment. Think about the last time you booked travel, bought a holiday gift, ordered flowers, or applied for a new credit card. Online or offline – doesn’t matter. What’s notable about that experience? What do you remember about it? Something? Nothing? In the midst of the market cacophony […]

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Put your consumer hat on for a moment. Think about the last time you booked travel, bought a holiday gift, ordered flowers, or applied for a new credit card. Online or offline – doesn’t matter. What’s notable about that experience? What do you remember about it? Something? Nothing?

In the midst of the market cacophony about customer experience, three facts define the fundamentals, once stripped of  hype:

  1. Every brand delivers an experience to customers and prospects, consciously or unconsciously. At Digital Clarity Group (DCG), we define experience as “the totality of interactions through all channels and touch points over the entire life of the relationship.” Experience happens by default. As consumers, we always remember the bad. We might remember the good. We mostly forget the vast majority of experience that’s just mediocre. Which is not great if you’re a brand spending lots of money to leave a good impression.
  2. Consciously managing the experience is the only way that a brand can bias the experience for the right business outcome. Consistently good experiences are not accidental. Only when experience is deliberately managed does it become repeatable, predictable, measurable, and capable of being improved and optimized.
  3. The business practice of holistically managing the customer experience across channels is new, and therefore hard and mysterious. One of the many reasons it’s hard is that you cannot just throw technology at it and get results. Today there is no such thing as an out-of-the-box solution for experience management. It’s mysterious because successful paths (by way of repeatable best practices) are still being cut by the pioneers.

If customer experience management (CEM) is hard, it is also not an option. As my DCG colleague Tim Walters notes, “…the mobile and social empowerment of consumers makes CEM an inescapable, compulsory, and essential initiative for virtually every company’s survival.”

Who’s caught between the proverbial rock and hard place? Chief marketing officers, digital marketers, customer experience champions, LOB owners, newly-minted data scientists, marketing technologies, IT – yep, everyone who feels the pressure that customers are putting on them for higher-quality, more meaningful engagement. They want to move forward, know they need to move forward. But they are frequently overwhelmed by identifying the right starting point for CEM.

In DCG’s work with our enterprise clients, we see another obstacle that presents an even bigger risk. It’s not just that getting started can be overwhelming – it’s also that too many companies are responding to contemporary CEM challenges with legacy practices, processes, and technologies that are misaligned with the new world order imposed by empowered consumers. Doing more of the same, just bigger, faster, better, is a sure path to obsolescence. It’s time for fundamental change.

When we engage in a selection or roadmap development project with an enterprise client, we are typically supporting the manager or team who needs to enable that change in collective thinking about experience management. We often start by helping them write the script for the conversations with stakeholders. A number of the issues addressed in those scripts are distilled in our paper entitled The CEM Imperative: Customer Experience in the Age of the Empowered Consumer. What’s at risk if you don’t take action now? What’s the business case for investing in capabilities and competencies for experience management? If no single CEM solution exists today, how will you build and deploy a platform and toolset for experience management? The CEM Imperative provides insights that can help you start to formulate answers to these and related questions. You can also use it as a call-to-action for senior managers and executives who are hesitating. As DCG author Tim Walters writes:

“CEM is not vendor hype, because it is a response to the desires and expectations of today’s extremely demanding and fickle consumers. CEM is not a back-burner consideration because, as … innumerable studies prove, engaging consumers with superior experiences is a matter of life or death for any firm that cares about having customers.”

Presumably your organization cares about having customers. If that’s the case, then addressing the risk of unmanaged – or mismanaged – experience must be a top strategic goal moving forward.

Download your copy
The CEM Imperative: Customer Experience in the Age of the Empowered Consumer

 

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Frank Gilbane http://bluebillinc.com <![CDATA[The future of watches]]> http://bluebillinc.com/?p=2170 2014-10-01T12:33:02Z 2014-10-01T12:33:02Z “The future of watches” title is a bit grand for this brief post, but this is somewhat of a companion piece to The future of tablets and the context of both is the evolution of computing devices. In the case of tablets we are still figuring out their role in the ecosystem after many years and over four since the […]

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Apple watch image - copyright Apple“The future of watches” title is a bit grand for this brief post, but this is somewhat of a companion piece to The future of tablets and the context of both is the evolution of computing devices. In the case of tablets we are still figuring out their role in the ecosystem after many years and over four since the initial iPad, the first breakthrough tablet. It will also take some time, and development, to see where smartwatches fit in, but it is now a much more interesting question.

The Apple watch announcement stumped many commentators who needed extra time to digest it. A reasonable reaction given neither product nor platform are done yet. This makes it a bit difficult for technology, market, or financial analysts to answer questions like what the Apple watch is really for, whether it is a new product category, will it be another breakthrough product for Apple, how it will change the mix of Apple revenue, do I actually need or want one.

Communication has been the killer app for computing at least since the Web and is why smartphones are the current king of the hill. Smartwatches are the most likely next-in-line competition to smartphones, certainly more so than tablets or glasses, before we enter the world of implants, stick-ons, or other fashion accessory choices. Smartwatches with phone functionality could surpass smartphones as the planet’s most popular personal computer: easier to carry around, potentially cheaper.

Apple would not be investing so heavily if they didn’t expect smartwatches to overtake or at least approximate the success of smartphones. They are betting large on the watch becoming a general purpose computer in the same way the iPhone has.

Or, they are reaching even further…

It doesn’t make sense for Apple to invest much in accessories, or niche markets. Even fitness is not interesting enough in itself. However, fitness is a great way to enter into the much larger healthcare opportunity, which in turn provides an environment to learn about new user experience technology and the complex device integration and data sharing necessary for it, and other complicated applications of general purpose computing. The iPhone would also benefit. This path also has the advantage of providing cover.

Also see:

Rich ruminating… Ben Evans: Ways to think about watches.

Working through what the Apple watch is about… Ben Thompson: What I Got Wrong About Apple Watch and Why Now for Apple Watch

Compared to other smartwatches… Rachel Metz:  Is This the Smart Watch You’ve Been Looking For?

Review from a watch industry analyst… Ariel Adams: Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century

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Frank Gilbane http://bluebillinc.com <![CDATA[The future of tablets]]> http://bluebilladvisors.com/?p=2086 2014-10-01T12:26:18Z 2014-05-07T01:44:38Z The future of tablets isn’t what analysts thought a year ago, or even last fall. The market for PCs continues to decline (but at a slowing rate: IDC, Gartner), yet tablet growth is also slowing forcing many analysts to scale back their forecasts. Smartphone growth is slowing as well. There is a lot of discussion, mainly from an […]

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The future of tablets isn’t what analysts thought a year ago, or even last fall.

The market for PCs continues to decline (but at a slowing rate: IDC, Gartner), yet tablet growth is also slowing forcing many analysts to scale back their forecasts. Smartphone growth is slowing as well.

There is a lot of discussion, mainly from an investor point of view about why: saturation, price points, supplier market share, etc., that are relevant for both business and consumer markets. Recently the focus has been on iPads because of Apple’s earnings call but the trend is not limited to Apple.

Why aren’t tablets taking more share away from PCs?

Given the phenomenal growth of tablets the last few years, their computing power, and the large overlap of general use cases shared with PCs (email, browsing) it did seem that tablets were on track replace PCs in large numbers. But the use case overlap was not large enough to support the forecasts. Tablets are tweeners, fighting for space between the superior communications of smartphones and greater productivity of PCs. Being in the middle is not normally a desirable spot for a product, but tablets excel at information and entertainment consumption and this middle is a pretty big and happy place to be.

What do we use PCs for? For years we have been using PCs for some combination of productivity, information / entertainment consumption, and communication. PCs were largely designed and most useful for productivity, whether business or personal, and that’s why we bought them. As PCs evolved and became capable and appealing for information/entertainment consumption and communication we bought more of them. And at some point whatever motivated us to buy a PC, our actual use of them flipped – we now spend a higher percentage of time using our PCs for information / entertainment consumption and communication than we do for productivity. And of course this is the domain of tablets and why they have taken as much of the PC market as they have.

But tablets are simply not as good as PCs for a large number of productivity applications. Until they are this will act as a governor on tablet growth and allow for a shrinking but still large market for PCs.

In The iPad Is a Tease Jean-Louis Gassée points out that:

So far, Apple’s bet has been to keep the iPad simple, rigidly so perhaps, rather than creating a neither-nor product: No longer charmingly simple, but not powerful enough for real productivity tasks. But if the iPad wants to cannibalize more of the PC market, it will have to remove a few walls.

I would say Gassée’s post is from the point of view of a user who would like to replace his PC with an iPad but can’t, that this is a larger cohort than enterprise users or even power users, and that this is the best way to think about the productivity penalty portion of slowing iPad sales.

What would make a significant dent in the iPad’s productivity penalty? Microsoft Office support alone is necessary but not sufficient. A better solution for text entry than accessory keyboards, smooth and rapid app switching, and easy file access would each make a big difference. See below for links to other thoughts.

There is also a maddening and ironic side effect of using iPads for industry applications where they are productivity enhancers. For example, I used to be able to choose between an iPad (mostly research and entertainment) and a laptop (mostly work) for most trips, but a couple of my current projects include working with apps that only run on the iPad. I can’t be productive without having both an iPad and a laptop. Even in the office I often need both within reach. Unfortunately this situation is likely to get worse as more iOS, (and Android!) productivity apps appear.

Watch out for smartphones

Benedict Evans suggested another avenue for inquiry in a tweet:

.@asymco @gassee posit: slow iPad sales are worse news for the PC market: implies phones can take the greater share of PC use cases

— Benedict Evans (@BenedictEvans) April 21, 2014

I don’t know Benedict, but I picture him smiling devilishly as he composed that tweet. As well he should have.

The more types of computing devices there are the more complicated figuring out use case fit is going to be.

The future of tablets

The future of tablets seems promising in the near term since neither PCs nor smartphones can match their information and entertainment consumption experience and tablets will get better at aiding productivity. The better they get the more market share they’ll take. And of course we haven’t seen all the new industry apps where the tablet form factor and interface is a net productivity advantage.

On the other hand, the right kind of user interface – perhaps a high resolution holographic interface not dependent on form factors for projection – would free us from our quaint categories of PCs, tablets, smartphones, smartwatches, glasses, and be truly disruptive. Once computing power and user interfaces become independent of physical size all bets are off.

Further reading on iPad growth:

The iPad’s Curse — Ben Bajarin

iPads and Tablet Growth – Benedict Evans

Don’t Give up on the iPad – Ben Thompson

How Apple Could Continue to Own the Enterprise Tablet Market — Tim Bajarin

The Astonishing, Disappointing iPad – MG Siegler

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Lynda Moulton http://www.lwmtechnology.com <![CDATA[Enterprise Search and Findability Survey 2014]]> http://bluebilladvisors.com/?p=2089 2014-08-29T14:11:29Z 2014-05-07T00:09:53Z For the third year, Findwise, an enterprise search system integrator and consulting firm based in Sweden, is doing a global survey of user experiences with content findability tools. Many of us in the field of search technology want to see how enterprises are progressing with their search initiatives. Having a baseline from 2012 is a […]

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For the third year, Findwise, an enterprise search system integrator and consulting firm based in Sweden, is doing a global survey of user experiences with content findability tools. Many of us in the field of search technology want to see how enterprises are progressing with their search initiatives. Having a baseline from 2012 is a beginning to see what the continuum looks like but we need more numbers from the user community. That means participation from institutional implementers, funding managers, administrators and end-users with a stake in the outcomes they receive when they use any search technology.

Please do not let this opportunity pass, and sign on to the survey and sign up to get the resulting report later in the year. I especially hope that Findwise gets a good uptick in responses to report at the December Gilbane conference. We need to hear more voices so pass this link along to colleagues in other organizations.

Here is the link: Enterprise Search and Findability Survey 2014

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Lynda Moulton http://www.lwmtechnology.com <![CDATA[Content Accessibility in the Enterprise is Really Search]]> http://bluebilladvisors.com/?p=2091 2015-03-05T01:34:52Z 2014-04-29T15:31:29Z The Gilbane Conference call for speakers is out and submissions are due in three days, May 2. As one who has been writing about enterprise search topics for over ten years, and engaged in search technology development since 1974, I know it is still a relevant topic. If you are engaged in any role, in […]

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The Gilbane Conference call for speakers is out and submissions are due in three days, May 2. As one who has been writing about enterprise search topics for over ten years, and engaged in search technology development since 1974, I know it is still a relevant topic.

If you are engaged in any role, in any type of content repository development or use, you know that excellent accessibility is fundamental to making content valuable and useable. You are also probably involved in influencing or trying to influence decisions that will make certain that technology implementations have adequate staffing for content metadata and controlled vocabulary development.

Please take a look at this conference track outline and consider where your involvement can be inserted. Then submit a speaking proposal to share your direct experiences with search or a related topic. Our conference participants love to hear real stories of enterprise initiatives that illustrate: innovative approaches, practical solutions, workarounds to technical and business problems, and just plain scrappy projects that bring value to a group or to the whole enterprise.  In other words, how do you get the job done within the constraints you have faced?

Track E: Content, Collaboration and Employee Engagement

Designed for content, information, technical, and business managers focused on enterprise social, collaboration, intranet, portal, knowledge, and back-end content applications.

  • Collaboration and the social enterprise
  • Collaboration tools & social platforms
  • Enterprise social metrics
  • Community building & knowledge sharing
  • Content management & intranet strategies
  • Enterprise mobile strategies
  • Content and information integration
  • Enterprise search and information access
  • Semantic technologies
  • Taxonomies, metadata, tagging

Please consider participating in the conference and especially if content findability and accessibility are high on your list of “must have” content solutions. Submit your proposal here. The need for good findability of content has never been higher and your experiences must be heard by vendors, IT managers and content experts together in this forum.

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Lynda Moulton http://www.lwmtechnology.com <![CDATA[Audio and Video: Metadata, Meta-tags, Meta-Understanding]]> http://bluebilladvisors.com/?p=2093 2014-09-01T20:28:20Z 2014-03-27T22:29:03Z 2014 opened with a post about findability; that theme continues with some thoughts on what it means to build an enterprise digital asset management (DAM) repository and have it actually deliver findability for audio and video content. Working on a project for an institution, which has experience using a DAM for image assets, I have […]

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2014 opened with a post about findability; that theme continues with some thoughts on what it means to build an enterprise digital asset management (DAM) repository and have it actually deliver findability for audio and video content.

Working on a project for an institution, which has experience using a DAM for image assets, I have become keenly aware of the heavy lift required for a similar system for audio and video files. Heavy lift means human resources with the knowledge to metatag assets manually. This metadata activity is necessary to establish text that describes the “aboutness” of an audio or video file. Search queries in a DAM are done using text and without text, finding an asset will be impossible.

Stephen Arnold raises many critical issues in the article Video Metadata: ripe for innovation in KMWorld, March, 2014. It articulates very well the challenge of indexing a video asset because, if any metadata exists, much of it will be transactional in nature, not descriptive of the content.

In any institution with limited content editorial or curatorial resources to catalog internally produced audio and video files, it will fall to the creator to describe with metadata what the essential elements are. Those elements might include, who is in the video, who is performing in an audio file, where did a performance take place, what are the major themes, what instruments were being featured, and so on. Software applications exist that can extract words from spoken or sung language, or from text images that are visible in a video. But when it comes to the “aboutness” or major themes being demonstrated, only the creator or creator’s surrogate will have the required meta-understanding.

Enterprises with a public face or commercial aspect will employ a metadata creation staff for images or files that go into their public web sites. However, justifying staffing to make audio and video a valuable asset for internal sharing and consumption is a tough sell. Commitment to building up an internal DAM that will be used and useful because its assets are easily found takes faith and almost religious fervor on the part of participating contributors. Technology can only go so far in making those assets findable. Attribute possibilities are voluminous and not easily codified.

On the arts frontier of searchability, one only has to look at the gold standard for controlled vocabulary, the Getty Museum, to see the breadth and depth of categories of their thesauri covering paintings, sculpture, drawing, crafts, woodworking, etc. In non-classical musicology no such universal standard of terminologies exists for public consumption. In the musical arts getting musicians to agree on how to label innovative and evolving genres will be a herculean human effort.

Building a DAM for internal audio and videos files is not to be undertaken without answering these questions:

  • How will findability be defined?
  • What is the audience?
  • Who is going to create the metadata for uploaded assets, particularly “locally created” content?
  • What are the technology tools that can index and search the assets?
  • What are the resources for establishing, modifying, and perpetually expanding taxonomies/controlled terminology?
  • When assets are found, how will they be displayed or played?
  • What is the on-going process for sustaining the repository, curating and expanding its scope?

This is a new frontier in content management. With so much investment in audio and video engineering, and the entertainment industry, it is time to innovate on the “findability” front, as well. In the meantime, a wise process for adoption is to start small and simple with the metadata development effort. Then hope that technology innovation will emerge to help your process before you retire.

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